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  • urs3477 - So far, so good

    I had to try this out as soon as it arrived because it's such an odd thing and got mixed reviews from people. But I hooked it up and added quick-release fittings and a sprayer and everything is fine. It is very light and easy to transport. Not sure how it will do with continued use - across the patio and in some gravel areas as people have said that the nylon breaks easily. Also, the plastic fitting could become a problem -- esp here in the Phoenix heat where plastic is not king. My plan, though, it not to leave it on the hose and in the sun. Use it and put it away which was the whole point of this - to not have a big hose laying around all the time kinked in the hose holder. As time goes by I'll add more information about this item. But I have high hopes.

  • Daniel Eglesia - Wish You Were There!

    After many years of enjoying Pink Floyd's music, I feel the Division Bell may indeed be their best album. The Division Bell grows on you, with each listen, and all the right ingredients of great music and lyrics are there to make it an enjoyable experience. I understand there is a lot of disagreement, among Pink Floyd fans, over who carries Pink Floyd's legacy, although the Division Bell further proves that David Gilmour, Richard Wright and Nick Mason made excellent music, together, without the input of Roger Waters.
    On July 6, 1977, I was fortunate enough to see Pink Floyd play at Montreal's Olympic Stadium during the Animals tour. At the time, Dark Side of the Moon and Wish You Were Here were still all the buzz in most people's heads, since Animals had just been released and was not yet as known as those previous two albums. Imagine that I was able to attend that concert in Montreal for $25, after purchasing a ticket in Plattsburgh, NY which included bus service to and from the concert, as well as admission to see the show. In addition, there was a keg of beer also provided, in the rear of the bus, which made the trip to Montreal that day all the more memorable. Back in those days, crossing the border, into Canada, was as simple as declaring one's citizenship and how long you planned to be there, but I don't believe the border guards even bothered to come onto the bus, because everyone knew Pink Floyd was going to be playing in Montreal and by the sound coming from the bus it was probably evident where we were going! The concert was general admission and me and a friend found ourselves sitting on the grass around 400 yards in front of stage. There were people walking around, with their faces painted, and all types of drugs being shared and/or consumed, as mental preparation for Pink Floyd to take the stage was highly anticipated by all. A distinct white cloud of smoke hovered over the crowd, emitted from the collective sharing of joints that circulated among the over 90,000 people in Olympic Stadium that day. The weather was perfect and no one was thinking who was the best member of Pink Floyd, or what turn their music would take in the future, because many, including myself, had also heard Meddle, Ummagumma or Obscured by Clouds and knew this band was always capable of producing quality music, even after the bar had been set so high with the release of Dark Side of the Moon. Even David Bowie's version of See Emily Play on his Pinups album was a compliment to the band, since Mick Ronson was such a great guitarist.
    As the concert got underway, the crowd was treated to the amazing live performance of nearly the entire Dark Side of the Moon and Wish You Were Here Albums with songs from Animals including in the mix. At one point in the show, a sixty foot helium pig was inflated and began its slow trek high over the crowd in Olympic stadium, but someone in the crowd fired a bottle rocket and the pig was sent back to the stage area and deflated. An exploding helium balloon would not be welcome by anyone and I understand it was during this concert that Roger Waters began to feel there was a Wall separating himself from the audience. The seeds for the next album were now being sown and no one but Roger Waters truly knows whether it was his ego or paranoia that forced him away from the band. Now, 35 years later, I feel the Wall was when Roger Waters showed the rest of us that he began to take himself too seriously and a division was also created between himself and the other members of Pink Floyd. The usual tempo and flow of music that makes Dark Side of the Moon and Wish You Were Here, as well as Animals, such enjoyable albums began to fade with the release of The Wall. I understand it was Roger's insistence on playing all the instruments, as well as writing the lyrics, that created the greatest division among members of Pink Floyd and we the fans must ask ourselves if it wasn't a good thing that David Gilmour wanted to prove his contributions to Pink Floyd by carrying on their music. The best song on The Wall is Comfortably Numb written and song by who? The same man who continued to carry the Pink Floyd banner, with Momentary Lapse of Reason and The Division Bell, with the help of Richard Wright and Nick Mason. If you listen to Pros and Cons of Hitch Hiking you will hear the point I'm making, carried to extreme, with Roger Water's screaming. David Gilmour is not capable of such nonsense and The Division Bell is a return to form for Pink Floyd. I only recently purchased The Division Bell, providing myself a time capsule of enjoyment, because I've always enjoyed the solo albums of Richard Wright and David Gilmour so much. Richard Wright's Wet Dream is pure pleasure and David Gilmour's three solo albums are equally great as his contributions with Pink Floyd.
    As a side note, I also saw Emerson, Lake and Palmer at the Olympic Stadium, later that same year, as they were accompanied by an 80 piece orchestra, which was only used in Montreal and New York, before being dropped because it was too expensive. I arrived at the Emerson, Lake and Palmer concert in Montreal on another bus trip from Plattsburg except this time I only paid $18.50!

  • Michael H. Lickteig "Mike" - Langdon and Dante a good mix in "Inferno".

    Scholar and Symbologist Robert Langdon is at it again in Dan Brown's latest novel, "Inferno" 2013. Set in Italy and Turkey, Langdon is once more caught in a web of intrigue that forces him to think fast and act faster. Brown's premise at first seemed to borrow heavily in style from his earlier work in "The Da Vinci Code", dropping Langdon into the middle of a mystery that ultimately threatens his life. (I'm surprised anyone in Langdon's fictional world ever agrees to have dealings with him. Wherever this guy shows up, chaos follows...) The story is rife with murder, intrigue, a young woman following him while allowing him to think out loud for the sake of the readers and, of course, symbols serving as clues for Langdon to decipher as he attempts to prevent a calamity. In the beginning it seemed almost too derivative and I wondered if "Inferno" would disappoint. The style was overly similar to his earlier work but there were sufficient plot twists and misdirection to keep Langdon's latest adventure fresh and captivating.
    As one might assume from the title, the symbolic content in this book draws heavily from Dante Alighieri's 14th century poem, "The Divine Comedy". I was skeptical that Dan Brown could integrate elements of Dante's piece into a fictional thriller, but Brown did not disappoint. As a fan of "The Divine Comedy" since my teen years, each reference added to my enjoyment of this novel. I also appreciated that "Inferno" is less scholarly and more action oriented than "The Da Vinci Code", and subsequently more satisfying as a suspense novel. The action is fast-paced and counter-balances the sometimes verbose descriptions of Florence, Venice and Istanbul. The style, if formulaic, still works. Brown does not disappoint us if our desire is to become absorbed in an entertaining novel. If I were to interject a critical note, it would be that his ending was slightly anticlimactic. After 400 pages of twists and turns, it almost seemed that Brown didn't know how to wrap it all up.
    Perhaps this laudatory review is overly complimentary, but I allow myself this because I enjoyed the book. Will Dan Brown be remembered in time with authors like Ernest Hemingway, Leo Tolstoy, Walt Whitman or even Agatha Christie? Perhaps not, but that is irrelevant. Brown gives us engrossing and entertaining novels that move at a fast past while making us think. For now, that's enough. I heartily recommend this novel and look forward to the possibility of Tom Hanks reprising his role as Langdon in another motion picture.

  • Jerry - Best Operating System Ever!

    I have a Samsung Business Slate with a core i5 processor, 4 megs of ram, and a 128 gig solid state drive. The package came with both the 64 and 32 bit versions of the operating system. I have and external Plextor drive which is over 5 years old, but did not have any trouble loading the software to the single USB port on my slate.
    The operating system itself is in my opinion, the fastest and most versatile that Microsoft has come out with yet. My slate, which is already very fast, is twice as fast as it was with Windows 7! This operating system was made for touchscreens, although it would also work very well on non touchscreen computers. If you have Vista, GET IT!