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  • YodaGoneMad - Extremely nice warm leather gloves!

    I purchased these on a whim during the black friday sales. When they arrived I was extremely impressed. These are really nice gloves. The leather is high quality and feels/smells great. The gloves are extremely well made. They fit comfortably thanks to spandex between the fingers and a really soft comfortable lining.

    These gloves also have 100 grams of Thinsulate which makes them extremely warm and water resistant. These are great to wear during the snowy months, I used them for my morning drive to work and my hands stayed toasty and dry.

    I would heartily recommend these gloves to anyone wanting a nice pair of leather gloves for the cold months of the year.

  • C. Tarles - Finally! A book for women who want to make informed decisions while pregnant

    I love healthy debates about books. It's one of my favorite pastimes. However, I'm quite discouraged by all of the 1-star, negative reviews on here that seem to take issue with 12 pages of this 281-page book that cover the topic of alcohol while pregnant. I don't believe the author states anywhere in this book that women should go out and drink while pregnant, nor does she minimize the struggles of those affected by Fetal Alcohol Syndrome. This book was written for educated, intelligent women who want the facts about a wide range of topics so that they may make decisions for themselves based on evidence and research. She would be remiss if she wrote this book and left out any mention of alcohol. In fact, on page 40 Oster writes: "There is no question that very heavy drinking during pregnancy is bad for your baby. Women who report binge drinking during pregnancy are more likely to have children with serious cognitive deficits." I think her stance is pretty clear on that.

    I am a healthcare professional who happens to work in a city where many of the residents are low-income and the majority have not finished high school. I completely, wholeheartedly believe that it would be irresponsible to go around hanging up posters telling moms-to-be to "Go ahead! Get wasted!" This is not who this book was written for. In fact, at no point did I feel that Oster was imposing her opinion on her readers; she says over and again in more or less words, "Here are the facts, here's the research, the choice is yours to make." She does, however, candidly share the choices she's made, and instead of criticizing her for that, we should be applauding her for her honesty.

    So -- who is Expecting Better for? It's for women like me who are sick and tired of getting "coloring your hair probably is fine" from one doctor and "you should probably wait until your second trimester" from another doctor. Or reading one popular website that says, "Put down that turkey sandwich!" while another says, "as long as you're getting it from a deli that changes their meats quickly you 'should' (there's that's word again) be fine..." I want facts and figures. I want peer-reviewed research. I want to know WHY it's a risk to drink too much caffeine, and why I'm not going to (hopefully) do major damage if I have to take a Tylenol.

    I'm happy for my friends and family who seem to be floating through their pregnancies without a care in the world. I've never been that kind of person who can just trust everything will be fine so long as I maintain a positive outlook. On the contrary, I have always been the person who believes in informed consent and carefully weighting risks and benefits before making choices. I do my research, then make my decision knowing that whatever consequences I face are a result of carefully thought-out decisions.

    Above all, I appreciate that the author treats pregnant women as responsible adults who are capable of making their own decisions. Too much of maternal fetal medicine in the U.S. resorts to directing the expectant mothers towards test, after test, after test with results being reported as "everything looks fine," without even so much as explaining what was done and why. This is my body and my baby and I'd like to have more of a say with what's going on, and I'd like to be armed with the most current research.

    Expecting Better will the THE book I recommend to every pregnant friend of mine from this point forward. It's a must-read. Take the information and make your own choices based on what's best for you. And, by all means, if you're that opposed to the Alcohol section (or any other section of the book), skip it.

    Great book!